Command-Line Interface (CLI)

The command-line interface (CLI) is one tool for controlling the switch and displaying information about its status and configuration. This chapter describes the use of the CLI.

This chapter includes these sections:

Accessing the eos CLI

You can open an eos CLI session through these connections:

  • Ethernet management ports
  • console port
  • Telnet connections
  • Secure Shell (SSH)

The following figure displays the eos CLI in a Secure Shell connection.

Figure 1. eos Command-Line Interface

Processing Commands

Command Execution

Command keywords are not case-sensitive. The CLI also accepts truncated keywords that uniquely correspond to one command.

  • The command abbreviation con does not execute a command in Privileged EXEC mode because the names of two commands begin with these letters: configure and connect.

    switch# con
    % Ambiguous command
    
  • The command abbreviation conf executes configure in Privileged EXEC mode because no other command name begins with conf.

    switch# conf
    switch(config)#
    

Creating an Alias

The alias command creates an alias for a CLI command. Entering the alias in the CLI executes the corresponding command.

Example

  • This command makes srie an alias for the command show running-config interface ethernet 1-5.
    
    switch(config)#alias srie show running-config interface ethernet 1-5
    switch(config)#srie
    interface Ethernet1
     switchport access vlan 33
     storm-control broadcast level 1
     spanning-tree portfast
     spanning-tree bpduguard enable
    interface Ethernet2
     switchport access vlan 33
     spanning-tree portfast
    interface Ethernet3
     switchport access vlan 33
     spanning-tree portfast
     spanning-tree bpduguard enable
    interface Ethernet4
    interface Ethernet5
     shutdown

Cursor Movement Keystrokes

eos supports these cursor movement keystrokes:

  • Ctrl-B or the Left Arrow key: moves cursor to the left.
  • Ctrl-F or the Right Arrow key: moves cursor to the right.
  • Ctrl-A: moves cursor to beginning of line.
  • Ctrl-E: moves cursor to end of line.
  • Esc-B: moves cursor left one word.
  • Esc-F: moves cursor right one word.

History Substitution Keystrokes

The history buffer retains the last 20 commands entered. History substitution keystrokes that access previously entered commands include:

  • Ctrl-P or the Up Arrow key: Recalls the most recent buffered commands. Repeat to recall older commands.
  • Ctrl-N or the Down Arrow key: Recalls more recent commands after using the Ctrl-P or the Up Arrow. Repeat to recall newer commands.

The show history command in Privileged EXEC mode displays the history buffer contents.

switch#show history
  en
  config
  exit
  show history

Command Lists and Syntax Assistance

eos CLI uses widely followed conventions for providing command lists and syntax assistance. These conventions are available in all command modes.

  • To display all commands available at this level, type a question mark (?):

    switchName>?
      clear       Reset functions
      connect     Open a terminal connection
      default     Set a command to its defaults
      disable     Turn off privileged commands
      enable      Turn on privileged commands
      exit        Exit from the EXEC
      logout      Exit from the EXEC
      no          Negate a command or set its defaults
      ping        Send echo messages
      show        Show running system information
      ssh         Open ssh connection
      tcpdump     Monitor packets with tcpdump
      telnet      Open a telnet connection
      terminal    Configure the terminal
      traceroute  Trace route to destination
      watch       Execute a command repeatedly
      who         Display information about terminal lines
      zerotouch   ZeroTouch configuration
    
  • To display a list of commands beginning with a specific character sequence, type the sequence followed by a question mark.

    switch# di?
    diffdirdisable
    
  • To display a command’s keywords or arguments, type a question mark as an argument.

    switch> ping ?
    WORD  Ping destination address or hostname
    ip    IPv4 echo
    ipv6  IPv6 echo
    mpls  Send echo messages for LSP
    vrf   Ping in a VRF
    
  • The switch accepts an address-mask or CIDR notation (address-prefix) in commands that require an IP address and mask. For example, these commands are processed identically:

    switch(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 10.1.1.254
    
    switch(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0/32 10.1.1.254
    
    
  • The switch accepts an address-wildcard or CIDR notation in commands requiring an IP address and wildcard. Wildcards use zeros to mask portions of the IP address and are found in some protocol configuration statements, including OSPF. The switch processes these commands identically:

    switch(config-router-ospf)# network 10.255.255.1 0.0.0.255 area 15
    
    switch(config-router-ospf)# network 10.255.255.1/24 area 15
    
    

Regular Expressions

A regular expression is a search pattern composed of symbols, letters and numbers. Some CLI parameters are defined as regular expressions for specifying more expressive search criteria. The switch uses regular expression pattern matching in several BGP commands.

The functionality of a regular expression for an AS-Path varies based on BGP regex asn and string mode configurations in the ip as-path regex-mode command.

The following tables describe the behavior of special characters in asn and string modes respectively.

 
Special Characters Characters Names Description Examples
. Period

 

Matches any AS number. ‘.’ matches ‘200’.

‘10.20’ matches ‘10 30 20’, but does not match ‘10 20’.

^ Caret Matches the specified expression at the beginning of an input string. Also used to exclude expressions in brackets while matching. ‘^123’ matches ‘123’, ‘123 456’, ‘123 456 789’, and so on; but does not match ‘1234’.

‘[^12]’ matches ‘1’, ‘2’, ‘3’, and so on; but does not match ‘12’.

* Asterisk Matches an entire AS number that appears either zero or more times. ‘200_100*_300’ matches '200 300', ‘200 100 300’, ‘200 100 100 300’, and so on.

'^100*$' matches empty AS path, '100', '100 100', '100 100 100', and so on.

+ Plus sign Matches an entire AS number appearing either one or more times. ‘10_20+_30’ matches ‘10 20 30’, ‘10 20 20 30’ and so on; but does not match ‘10 200 30’.
$ Dollar sign Matches the specified expression at the end of an input string. ‘1_2_3$’ matches ‘1 2 3’, but does not match ‘1 2 3 4’.
[] Brackets Matches either an AS number, or a range of AS numbers separated by a hyphen. ‘[10_20_30-39]’ matches ‘10’, ‘20’, ‘30’, ‘31’,...’39’.
? Question mark Matches either zero or one occurrence of the pattern but the previous operand or entire AS number may appear zero or one time. ‘100_200?’ matches ‘100’ and ‘100 200’.

‘100_200?$’ does not match with ‘100 20’.

| Pipe Matches the specified AS number on either side of the vertical bar. ‘6400|6500’ matches either ‘6400’ or ‘6500’.
( ) Parenthesis Nests specified AS numbers for matching. ‘^(100(200|300))$’ matches either ‘100 200’ or ‘100 300’.

‘^100_200|300_400$’ matches AS path either “100 200” or “300 400”.

_ Underscore Matches specified AS numbers that are converted into AS number delimiters. ‘_123_456_’ matches ‘123 456’.

‘_333_444_’ matches ‘111 222 {333 444}’.

Note: Precede the question mark (?) with Ctrl+V sequence to prevent it from being interpreted as a help command.
 
Special Characters Characters Names Description Examples
. Period Matches any single character. ‘1.2’ matches ‘102’.
^ Caret Matches the specified expression at the beginning of an input string. ‘^123’ matches ‘123’, ‘1234’, ‘12345’, and so on. It also matches ‘123 456’, ‘123 456 789’, and so on.
* Asterisk Matches either zero or more sequences of the expression preceding the asterisk. '^5*$' matches an empty AS path, '5', '55', '555', and so on.
+ Plus sign Matches either one or more sequences of the expression preceding the plus sign. ‘5+’ matches to ‘5’, ‘55’, ‘555’, and so on.
$ Dollar sign Matches the expression at the end of an input string. ‘123$’ matches ‘123’, but does not match ‘1234’.
[] Brackets Matches either characters or a range of characters separated by a hyphen, within left and right brackets. ‘[025-7]’ matches ‘0’, ‘2’, and digits from ‘5’ to ‘7’; but does not match digits from ‘1’, ‘3’, ‘4’, ‘8’, and ‘9’.
? Question mark Matches either zero or one occurrence of the pattern. '12?3' matches '13' and '123'.
| Pipe Matches either one of the expressions or expression patterns on either side of the vertical bar. ‘14(36|75)12’ matches either ‘143612’ or ‘147512’; but does not match ‘1412’, ‘14367512’, ‘14363612’ or ‘14757512’.
( ) Parenthesis Nests specified expressions for matching. ‘(17)*’ matches any number of the two-character string ‘17’.
_ Underscore For AS-Path regex, '_' matches curly brackets '{}', the beginning of input string, the end of input string, or space. ‘_1300_’ matches ‘100 {1300 1400}’, ‘100 1300 200’, and so on.
{} Braces Matches repetitions of the previous expression with the number of repetitions provided in braces. '10{2,3}' matches '100' and '1000'.
\ Backslash Matches the character following the backslash and special characters. ‘\(42’ matches ‘(42’.

Precede the question mark (?) with Ctrl+V sequence to prevent it from being interpreted as a help command.

Scheduling CLI Commands

The schedule command facilitates the periodic execution of the specified CLI command. Command parameters configure the time to start script execution, the interval between consecutive execution instances, the maximum time to execute the script, and the maximum number of files log that needs to be created.

The schedule config command sets configuration parameters to the CLI scheduler.

The show schedule command lists the commands currently scheduled for periodic execution and displays the summary of the specified scheduled command.

Examples

  • This command schedules the execution of a script once every 12 hours and the script execution is terminated if it exceeds 40 minutes. When max-log-files is set to zero, the script output is not logged.

    switch# schedule ms_1 interval 720 timeout 40 max-log-files 0 command bash /mnt/flash/myscript.sh
  • This command saves the running configuration contents to a log file every hour, terminates the script execution if it exceeds 30 minutes and creates up to 24 log files.

     switch#schedule backup-test interval 60 max-log-files 24 command show running-config 
  • This command allows the switch to concurrently execute up to 2 scheduled commands.

    switch(config)#schedule config max-concurrent-jobs 2
    switch(config)#
    
  • This command lists the commands that are scheduled for periodic execution.

    switch(config)#schedule config max-concurrent-jobs 3
    switch(config)#show schedule summary
    Maximum concurrent jobs3
    Prepend host name to logfile: No
    NameAt timeLastInterval Timeout Max Logfile Location Status
     time (mins)(mins)log
     files
    ------------- ------------- ------- ---------- -------- -------- ------------------------------- ------
    tech-supportnow00:296030100 flash:schedule/tech-support/ Success
    thelp 12:02:00 00:026040100 flash:schedule/thelp/Fail
    06/05/2018
    switch(config)#

Running Bash Shell Commands Automatically with Event Handlers

Event handlers execute a Linux Bash shell command in response to a specific system event. An event handler consists of a Bash command, a trigger and a delay; when the trigger event occurs, the action is scheduled to run after delay seconds.

To create an event handler, use the event-handler command. This creates a new event handler and places the CLI in event handler configuration mode for that handler. Use the action bash command to configure a Bash command to run when the handler is triggered, and the trigger command to specify the trigger. Event handlers can be triggered by various events, including:

  • system booting
  • a change in a specified interface’s operational status or IP address
  • a change in the startup-config file
  • a state change in a virtual machine monitored by VM Tracer

To change the delay period between the trigger and the action, use the delay command.

When an action is run, certain information is passed to it through environment variables. For the boottrigger, no variables are set. For the interface triggers, the following variables are set and passed to the action:

  • $INTF     interface name

    • $OPERSTATE     current operational status of the specified interface
    • $IP-PRIMARY   current primary IP address of the specified interface

To execute more than one Bash command in response to a trigger, create a script containing the desired commands and enter the file path to the script as the argument of the action bash command.

To display information about all event handlers or about a specific event handler, use the show event-handler command.

The no event-handler command deletes an event handler.

Examples

  • These commands create an event handler named “eth_4” which will send email to a specified address when there is a change in the operational status of Ethernet interface 4:

    switch(config)#event-handler eth_4
    switch(config-event-eth_4)#action bash email x@yz.com -s "Et4 $OPERSTATE"
    switch(config-event-eth_4)#trigger on-intf ethernet 4 operstatus
    switch(config-event-eth_4)#delay 60
    switch(config-event-eth_4)#exit
    switch(config)#

The above handler uses the $OPERSTATE variable to include the current operational state (“linkup” or “linkdown”) in the subject of the email. Note that the action will only function if email has been configured on the switch.

  • These commands create an event handler named “onStartup” which will execute a user-defined script 60 seconds after the system boots.

    switch(config)#event-handler onStartup
    switch(config-event-onStartup)#action bash /mnt/flash/startupScript1
    switch(config-event-onStartup)#trigger onboot
    switch(config-event-onStartup)#delay 60
    switch(config-event-onStartup)#exit
    switch(config)#

The above handler will also be executed on exiting from event-handler configuration mode.

  • This command displays information about all event handlers configured on the system.

    switch#show event-handler
    Event-handler onStartup
    Trigger: onboot delay 60 seconds
    Action: /mnt/flash/startupScript1
    Last Trigger Activation Time: 1 minutes 51 seconds ago
    Total Trigger Activations: 1
    Last Action Time: 51 seconds ago
    Total Actions: 1
    
    switch#
  • This command deletes the event handler named “onStartup”.

    switch(config)#no event-handler onStartup
    switch(config)#

Running Adverse Drop Counters Monitor with Event Handlers

A monitoring capability for adverse drop counters can be used as a warning that the system is encountering an abnormal condition. The adverse drop counter monitor runs periodically (with a default of 60 seconds) and performs the following actions:

  • Reads the values of adverse drop counters.
  • Compares each value to the value read in the previous run.
  • If counter values increase more than a certain threshold (with a default of 100), it is considered as a threshold violation.
  • If any counter has more than a certain number of threshold violations within a specific time window (with a default of 3 violations within 15 minutes) a syslog message is logged.

No configuration is required to enable adverse drop counters monitor with event handlers. It is enabled by default and can be disabled, and can be customized for duration of time window and threshold levels. To customize the delay, polling interval, and condition for width, violation count, and threshold of this event handler, use the event-handler DropCountersHandler command. To display details of this event handler, use the show event-handler DropCountersHandler command.

Examples

  • These commands customize the delay, polling interval, and condition for width, violation count, and threshold of this event handler. Each parameter may be customized separately, with all other parameters remaining unchanged.

    switch(config)#event-handler DropCountersHandler
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler)#action bash DropCounterLog.py -l
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler)#delay 0
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler)#trigger on-counters
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#poll interval 60
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#condition 
    bashCmd."DropCounterMonitor.py" -w 800" > 0
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#condition 
    bashCmd."DropCounterMonitor.py" -c 5" > 0
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#condition 
    bashCmd."DropCounterMonitor.py" -t 200" > 0
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#
  • This command disables this event handler.

    switch(config)#no event-handler DropCountersHandler
    switch(config)#
  • This command displays details of this event-handler.

    switch(config)#show event-handler DropCountersHandler
    Event-handler DropCountersHandler (BUILT-IN)
    Trigger: on-counters delay 0 seconds
    Polling Interval: 60 seconds
    Condition: bashCmd."DropCounterMonitor.py" > 0
    Threshold Time Window: 0 Seconds, Event Count: 1 times
    Action: DropCounterLog.py -l
    Action expected to finish in less than 20 seconds
    Total Polls: 39
    Last Trigger Detection Time: 38 minutes 22 seconds ago
    Total Trigger Detections: 1
    Last Trigger Activation Time: 38 minutes 22 seconds ago
    Total Trigger Activations: 1
    Last Action Time: Never
    Total Actions: 1
    
    switch(config)#

Kernel-based Virtual Machine Commands and Configuration

Arista’s eos has leveraged its unmodified Linux kernel, and embraced open source standards-based technology that has brought operating system virtualization to Ethernet switching, utilizing the kernel-based virtual machine (KVM) as follows:

  • The hypervisor is the Linux kernel.
  • The core virtualization infrastructure is provided by the kernel module.
  • The CPU-specific implementation is provided by the processor-specific module (Intel or AMD).
  • The generic machine emulator and virtualizer KVM is provided by a Modified Quick Emulator (QEMU), which transforms the Linux kernel into the hypervisor.

The standard Linux kernel is the hypervisor, resulting in changes to the standard kernel (such as memory support and scheduler). Optimizations to these Linux components (such as a new scheduler in the 2.6 kernel) benefit both the hypervisor (host operating system) and Linux guest operating systems. With the kernel acting as the hypervisor, the switch can run other operating systems, such as Windows or Linux.

All components required are pre-installed with the Arista eos software image, requiring only the download of the image. A few additional configuration steps get the KVM fully operational.

This chapter contains the following sections:

KVM Commands

The following table covers KVM commands used throughout the configuration.

Table 1. KVM Commands
Command Description
comment Up to 240 character comment for this mode.
default Set a command to its defaults.
disk-image Add Virtual Machine disk image.
enable Enable VM.
exit Exit from Virtual Machine configuration mode.
memory-size Set memory size.
no Negate a command or set its defaults.
show Show running system information.
virtual-nic Add virtual NIC.
vnc-port Set VNC server port.
! ! Append to comment.

CLI Commands

The following KVN CLI commands are used throughout the configuration.

vm

In config mode, the vm CLI command creates or deletes a KVM configuration, or enters config-vm mode. A newly created KVM will have an empty config file path and is disabled.

The CLI command syntax is as follows:

[no] vm NAME
config-file

In config-vm mode, the config-file CLI command sets the path of the libvirt config file, using standard file syntax (e.g. flash:vm/NetscalerVPX.xml or sata1:vm/NetscalerVPX.xml or /mnt/sata1/vm/NetscalerVPX.xml). Changing this value does not affect the state of a currently enabled KVM. To use the new file, the user must disable and then re-enable the KVM.

The CLI command syntax is as follows:

config-file [PATH]
enabled

In config-vm mode, the enabled CLI command allows enabling a currently disabled VM, causing it to start up immediately. If a VM is enabled in the startup-config, it starts up automatically when eos boots (or when VirtAgent starts).

The CLI command syntax is as follows:

[no] enabled

Disabling a currently enabled VM initiates a shutdown process in the following sequence:

  • Attempt to shut down the VM politely if the guest OS supports ACPI.
  • If the VM is still running after 30 seconds, terminate it.
show vm

In enable mode, the show vm CLI command prints information about the configuration and status of a KVM, or of all KVMs if NAME is omitted, as follows:

  • Configuration: Name, config file path, and enabled.
  • Status: PID, log file path, and serial console pty path.
  • Current resource usage: RES, CPU%
  • (Detailed only) contents of the config file.
  • (Detailed only) contents of the log file.

The CLI command syntax is as follows:

show vm [detailed] [NAME]
attach vm

In enable mode, the attach vm CLI command connects to a KVM's serial console pty (using virsh console).

Note: Press Ctrl-] to exit to the CLI.

The CLI command syntax is as follows:

attach vm [NAME]
show tech-support

The CLI command syntax is as follows:

show tech-support [detailed] [NAME]
reload

In enable mode, the reload CLI command is executed before restarting the system, and will shut down currently enabled KVMs using the same process as the no enabled command in config-vm mode.

The CLI command syntax is as follows:

reload

KVM Configuration

Arista eos enables kernel-based virtual machine (KVM) instances by running KVM on the control-plane CPU of the switch. KVM instances can be defined from the CLI.

To configure a KVM, you must download the virtual machine image and configure the eos.

This section contains the following topics:

Configuring a KVM

To configure a KVM, perform the following steps:

  1. Download the Virtual Machine Image to /mnt/flash
  2. Name the virtual machine: switch(config)#virtual-machine [kvm_name]
    Example:
    switch(config)#virtual-machine foo 
  3. Provide a pointer to the image: switch(config-vm-foo)#disk-image [file:[path] image-format [format]
    Example:
    disk-image file:/mnt/flash/fedora.img image-format qcow2
  4. Define the amount of memory allocated: switch(config-vm-foo)#memory-size [size in bytes]
  5. Bind the virtual NIC to an SVI (or management interface): switch(config-vm-foo)#virtual-nic 1 vlan [1-4] switch(config-vm-foo)#virtual-nic 1 management [1-4]
  6. Create the VNC server’s tcp port (display): switch(config-vm-foo)#vnc-port [vnc-port number]
  7. Enable the virtual machine: switch(config-vm-foo)#enable

    Optionally attach to the virtual machine via VNC client pointed to the switch’s IP address. However, if Kernel hair-pinning is currently not enabled, preventing communication directly with the local switch, all traffic must have a destination on another networked device (such as a router, switch, or server).

    For specifics about KVM please visit http://www.linux-kvm.org/ .

    Note: In the Real VNC Viewer for Options, Expert, and ColorLevel, if the default value is pal8, establishing a session may fail. If this occurs, set this value to full and reconnect.

    Example

    switch#copy http://berrange.fedorapeople.org/images/2012-02-
    29/f16-x86_64-openstack-sda.qcow2
    (http://berrange.fedorapeople.org/images/2012-02-29/f16-x86_64-
    openstack-sda.qcow2) flash:
    ...
    switch(config)#virtual-machine foo
    switch(config-vm-foo)#disk-image file:/mnt/flash/fedora.img image-format qcow2
    switch(config-vm-foo)#memory-size 512
    switch(config-vm-foo)#virtual-nic 1 vlan 1
    switch(config-vm-foo)#virtual-nic 2 management 1
    switch(config-vm-foo)#vnc-port 5900
    switch(config-vm-foo)#enable

Configuring a Guest KVM

To configure a guest KVM, perform the following steps:

  1. Download the Virtual Machine Image to /mnt/flash
  2. Name the virtual machine: switch(config)#virtual-machine [guest_name]
    Example:
    switch(config)#virtual-machine guest123
  3. Provide a pointer to the image:switch(config-vm-guest123)#disk-image [file:[path] image-format [format]
    Example:
    switch(config-vm-guest123)#disk-image flash:f16-x86_64-openstack-sda.qcow2 image-format ? 
    iso iso image format   qcow qcow image format   qcow2 qcow2 image format   raw raw image format   
    vmdk vmdk image format switch(config-vm-guest123)#disk-image 
    flash:f16-x86_64-openstack-sda.qcow2 image-format qcow2
  4. Define the amount of memory allocated: switch(config-vm-guest123)#memory-size [size in bytes]
  5. Bind the virtual NIC to an SVI (or management interface): switch(config-vm-guest123)#virtual-nic 1 vlan [1-4] switch(config-vm-guest123)#virtual-nic 2 management [1-4]
  6. Create the VNC server’s tcp port (display): switch(config-vm-guest123)#vnc-port [vnc-port number]
  7. Enable the virtual machine: switch(config-vm-guest123)#enable

    Example

    switch#copy http://berrange.fedorapeople.org/images/2012-02-
    29/f16-x86_64-openstack-sda.qcow2
    (http://berrange.fedorapeople.org/images/2012-02-29/f16-x86_64-
    openstack-sda.qcow2) flash:
    ...
    switch#config terminal
    switch(config)#virtual-machine ?
    WORD Virtual Machine name
    switch(config)#virtual-machine foo
    switch(config-vm-foo)#disk-image flash:f16-x86_64-openstack-sda.qcow2 image-format ?
    iso iso image format
    qcowqcow image format
    qcow2 qcow2 image format
    raw raw image format
    vmdkvmdk image format
    switch(config-vm-foo)#disk-image flash:f16-x86_64-openstack-sda.qcow2 image-format qcow2
    switch(config-vm-foo)#memory-size 1024
    switch(config-vm-foo)#virtual-nic ?
    <1-4> Virtual NIC Id
    switch(config-vm-foo)#virtual-nic 1 ?
    ManagementManagement interface
    VlanVlan interface
    switch(config-vm-foo)#virtual-nic 1 vlan 1
    switch(config-vm-foo)#virtual-nic 2 management 1
    switch(config-vm-foo)#enable
    switch(config-vm-foo)#
    switch(config-vm-foo)#^Z
    switch#write mem
    switch#
    switch#show virtual-machine detail
    Virtual Machine: foo
    Enabled: Yes
    State: Running
    Disk Image:/mnt/flash/f16-x86_64-openstack-sda.qcow2
    Disk Image Format: qcow2
    Memory Size: 1024MB
    VNC port: 5900
    Virtual Nic: vnic1
    Mac Address: 52:54:00:ee:11:c9
    Device:Vlan1
    Model Type:e1000
    Virtual Nic: vnic2
    Mac Address: 52:54:00:df:2a:e1
    Device:Management1
    Model Type:e1000
    switch#

Switch Platforms

Features and CLI commands vary by switch platform. CLI options may also vary by switch platform for commands that are available on all platforms. Command descriptions in this manual describe feature availability and command parameters on the basis of switch platform, noting exceptions that exist among models that use a common platform.

These sections describe the following topics:

Viewing the Model Number

To view the switch’s model number through the CLI, enter the show version command.

Example

  • This command displays the model number, serial number, system MAC address, and manufacturing information of a DCS-7150S-64 switch.

    switch> show version
    Arista DCS-7150S-64-CL-F
    Hardware version:01.01
    Serial number: JPE13120819
    System MAC address:001c.7326.fd0c
    
    Software image version: 4.13.2F
    Architecture: i386
    Internal build version: 4.13.2F-1649184.4132F.2
    Internal build ID:eeb3c212-b4bd-4c19-ba34-1b0aa36e43f1
    
    Uptime: 16 hours and 39 minutes
    Total memory: 4017088 kB
    Free memory:1348228 kB
    
    switch>
    

Modular System Platforms – 7500 and 7500E Series Switches

Modular switch platforms depend on their installed modules along with the fabric and forwarding software modes. The show module command displays the fabric modules in the switch. System performance in switches containing both module types is based on first-generation fabric capabilities. Best practice is to avoid switch configurations with mixed fabric modules.

These sections describe modular switch components and software modes that program their capacities.

Fabric Modules and Fabric Mode – 7500 and 7500E Series Switches

Each modular switch fabric module is categorized as first-generation or E-Series:

  • First-generation fabric modules support all basic switch functions.
  • E-Series fabric modules support faster fabric link speeds, greater internal table capacities, and advanced encoding formatting.

Fabric mode determines the switch’s fabric performance capabilities. This mode must match the fabric modules in the switch. Fabric mode settings include:

  • fe600: Supports first-generation fabric modules.
  • fe1600: Supports E-Series fabric modules.

E-series fabric modules can operate in fe600 mode, but are limited to first-generation fabric performance. First-generation modules cannot operate in fe1600 mode. Switches containing both types of modules must be set to fe600 mode. Best practice is to avoid switch configurations with mixed fabric modules.

When a switch reloads, fabric mode is determined by the following (in order of precedence):

  1. Switches reloading in petraA forwarding compatibility mode( Linecard Modules and Forwarding Compatibility Mode – 7500 and 7500E Series)also reload in fe600 fabric mode.
  2. As specified by the platform sand fabric mode (7500 and 7500E Series) statement in running-config.
  3. The first fabric module that becomes operational as the switch reloads.

 

In switches with a homogeneous module set, the fabric mode matches its fabric modules. Switches with a mixed set of modules are typically reloaded in fe600 mode because first generation modules are usually operational before E-Series modules. However, the fabric mode in mixed module switches that are reloading cannot be guaranteed in the absence of the first two conditions.

Example

  • This command configures the switch to reload in fe1600 fabric mode to support E-series fabric modules. After issuing this command, the switch should be reset only after exchanging all switch fabric modules to E-series modules.

    switch(config)#platform sand fabric mode fe1600
    switch(config)#exit
    switch#show platform sand compatibility
     ConfigurationStatus
    Forwarding modeNone Arad
    Fabric modeFe1600 Fe600
    switch#
    

Determining a Switch’s Operating Platform

FM6000 Platforms

To determine the operating platform on switch, display platform command options from Global Configuration command mode.

  • This command displays the operating platform of a switch operating on the FM6000 platform (7150 Series switches).

    switch(config)# platform ?
    fm6000FM6000 chip
    
    switch(config)#platform
    
Arad and Petra Platforms

The platform ? command displays the same options on Arad and Petra platform switches. Refer to Viewing the Model Number to determine the switch’s model number.

Arad and Petra platform switch typically utilize multiple chips.Multi-Chip Devices describe methods of determining the port distribution on multi-chip platforms.

Example
  • These commands display platform options of a switch operating on either Petra or Arad platforms.

    switch(config)# platform ?
    aradArad switch chip
    fe1600Fe1600 chip
    fe600 Fe600 fabric chip
    petraAPetraA switch chip
    ptp Precision Time Protocol
    sandSand platform
    
    switch(config)#platform
    
Trident and Trident II Platforms

The platform ? command returns trident on switches that operate on Trident or Trident II platforms. Trident II platform switches include options that configure the forwarding and routing tables. To determine the Trident platform that a switch uses, display platform trident options.

  • These commands indicate that the switch is operating on the Trident II platform:

    switch(config)# platform ?
    ptpPrecision Time Protocol
    tridentTrident chip
    
    switch(config)# platform trident ?
    fabricFabric configuration
    forwarding-tableForwarding table configuration
    mmu Trident MMU configuration
    routing-table Routing table configuration
    
    switch(config)#platform trident
    

Fixed and Modular switches are available that operate on the Trident II platform. Refer to Viewing the Model Number to determine the switch’s model number. Viewing Modules on 7300 Series Modular Switches displays the modules on a Trident II platform modular switch.

Trident II platform switches typically utilize multiple chips. Multi-Chip Devices describes methods of determining port distribution on multi-chip platforms.

Linecard Modules and Forwarding Compatibility Mode – 7500 and 7500E Series

Each modular switch linecard module is categorized as first-generation or E-Series:

  • First-generation linecard modules support all basic switch functions.
  • E-Series linecard modules support provide faster data processing, greater internal table capacities, and advanced encoding formatting.

The forwarding compatibility mode determines the switch’s performance capabilities when forwarding data between linecard interfaces. Forwarding compatibility mode settings include:

  • PetraA: Supports first-generation linecard modules.
  • Arad: Supports E-Series linecard modules.

Forwarding compatibility mode determines the operational capacity of installed linecards. The following table lists the affect of the forwarding compatibility mode on linecard module types.

Table 2. Linecard Module and Forwarding Mode Performance
Linecard Module Type Forwarding Compatibility Mode Linecard Operating Capacity
First-generation petraA First-generation performance capacity.
First-generation arad Linecard is powered-down.
E-Series petraA First-generation performance capacity.
E-Series arad E-series performance capacity.
Note: Switches must contain E-Series fabric modules to operate at E-Series performance capacities.

The forwarding compatibility mode is configured by the platform sand forwarding mode (7500 and 7500E Series) command. This command may be required after exchanging a linecard for a different module type or in switches containing first-generation and E-series linecards.

Without a platform sand forwarding mode (7500 and 7500E Series) command, forwarding compatibility mode is determined by the first linecard that is operational after reloading the switch. In a switch that is reloaded with a homogeneous module set, forwarding compatibility mode matches its linecards. Switches with a mixed set of modules are typically reloaded in petraA mode because first generation modules are usually operational before E-Series modules. However, forwarding compatibility mode in mixed module switches that are reloading is not guaranteed without a platform sand forwarding mode command.

Example
This command changes the forwarding software mode to support E-series linecard modules. This command should be run only after exchanging all linecards to E-series modules.
switch(config)# platform sand forwarding mode arad
switch(config)#

Viewing Modules – 7500 and 7500E Series

The show module command displays the model number of all installed modules.

  • This command displays the modules of a 7504 switch that contains first-generation modules.

    switch>show module
    ModulePorts Card TypeModel Serial No.
    --------- ----- ------------------------------------ --------------- -----------
    1 2 DCS-7500 Series Supervisor Module7500-SUPJSH11440327
    2 1 Standby supervisor Unknown Unknown
    3 4848-port SFP+ 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LCJSH10449938
    4 4848-port SFP+ 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LCJSH11091247
    5 4848-port SFP+ 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LCJSH11211614
    6 4848-port SFP+ 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LCJSH11520288
    Fabric1 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11451230
    Fabric2 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11451210
    Fabric3 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11410115
    Fabric4 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11380318
    Fabric5 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11340955
    Fabric6 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11410128
    
    ModuleMAC addressesHwSwStatus
    --------- -------------------------------------- ------- ------- -------
    1 00:1c:73:03:06:ac - 00:1c:73:03:06:ac07.06 4.12.1Active
    24.12.1Standby
    3 00:1c:73:03:80:44 - 00:1c:73:03:80:7306.00 Ok
    4 00:1c:73:03:e4:34 - 00:1c:73:03:e4:6307.10 Ok
    5 00:1c:73:12:0b:3f - 00:1c:73:12:0b:6e07.30 Ok
    6 00:1c:73:12:b6:3f - 00:1c:73:12:b6:6e08.00 Ok
    Fabric105.03 Ok
    Fabric205.03 Ok
    Fabric305.02 Ok
    Fabric405.02 Ok
    Fabric505.02 Ok
    Fabric605.02 Ok
    switch>
  • This command displays modules of a 7504 switch that contains E-Series modules.

    switch>show module
    ModulePorts Card TypeModel Serial No.
    --------- ----- ------------------------------------ --------------- -----------
    1 3 DCS-7500E-SUP Supervisor Module7500E-SUP JAS13060306
    3 7248 port 10GbE SFP+ & 2x100G Linecard 7500E-72S-LCJAS12410019
    4 7248 port 10GbE SFP+ & 2x100G Linecard 7500E-72S-LCJPE13041458
    5 7248 port 10GbE SFP+ & 2x100G Linecard 7500S-72S-LCJAS12380089
    Fabric1 0 DCS-7504-E Fabric Module 7504E-FMJAS12370008
    Fabric2 0 DCS-7504-E Fabric Module 7504E-FMJAS12380012
    Fabric3 0 DCS-7504-E Fabric Module 7504E-FMJAS12370014
    Fabric4 0 DCS-7504-E Fabric Module 7504E-FMJAS12380008
    Fabric5 0 DCS-7504-E Fabric Module 7504E-FMJAS12380017
    Fabric6 0 DCS-7504-E Fabric Module 7504E-FMJAS12370009
    
    ModuleMAC addressesHwSwStatus
    --------- -------------------------------------- ------- ------- -------
    1 00:1c:73:00:f4:cd - 00:1c:73:00:f4:ce00.00 4.12.3Active
    3 00:1c:73:00:9c:7b - 00:1c:73:00:9c:c200.00 Ok
    4 00:1c:73:28:a0:57 - 00:1c:73:28:a0:9e00.00 Ok
    5 00:1c:73:00:9a:cb - 00:1c:73:00:9b:1202.07 Ok
    Fabric100.00 Ok
    Fabric200.00 Ok
    Fabric300.00 Ok
    Fabric400.00 Ok
    Fabric500.00 Ok
    Fabric600.00 Ok
    switch>

Viewing Modules on 7300 Series Modular Switches

7300 Series Modular switches operate on Trident II platform. The show module command displays the model number of all installed modules.

switch>show module
ModulePorts Card TypeModel Serial No.
--------- ----- ------------------------------------ --------------- -----------
1 3 Supervisor 7300X SSD DCS-7300-SUP-DJAS13340024
3 128 32 port 40GbE QSFP+ LC 7300X-32Q-LCJPE13440416
4 6448 port 10GbE SFP+ & 4 port QSFP+ LC 7300X-64S-LCJAS13310113
5 6448 port 10GbE SFP+ & 4 port QSFP+ LC 7300X-64S-LCJAS13340033
6 6448 port 10GbE SFP+ & 4 port QSFP+ LC 7300X-64S-LCJAS13310103
Fabric1 0 7304X Fabric Module7304X-FMJAS13320077
Fabric2 0 7304X Fabric Module7304X-FMJAS13350043
Fabric3 0 7304X Fabric Module7304X-FMJAS13350050
Fabric4 0 7304X Fabric Module7304X-FMJAS13350056

ModuleMAC addressesHwSwStatus
--------- -------------------------------------- ------- ------- -------
1 00:1c:73:36:4b:71 - 00:1c:73:36:4b:7201.01 4.13.3F Active
3 00:1c:73:58:d4:68 - 00:1c:73:58:d4:8703.04 Ok
4 00:1c:73:36:05:61 - 00:1c:73:36:05:9402.02 Ok
5 00:1c:73:36:0a:e1 - 00:1c:73:36:0b:1402.03 Ok
6 00:1c:73:36:02:e1 - 00:1c:73:36:03:1402.02 Ok
Fabric100.00 Ok
Fabric200.00 Ok
Fabric300.00 Ok
Fabric400.00 Ok
switch>

Multi-Chip Devices

Trident II, Petra, and Arad platform switches and linecards utilize multiple chips, with Ethernet ports evenly distributed among the chips. Creating multi-port data structures (including port channels) that include ports from multiple chips protects against the failure of an individual chip on a device.

The following sections describe methods of determining port distribution on various switch platforms

Petra Fixed Switches

7048-Series switches are Petra platform devices that distribute ports among two PetraA chips. The show platform petraA port-info routing command displays the ports that are controlled by each chip.

Example

  • This command displays the following Ethernet port distribution on a DCS-7048-T switch:

    • Petra0 chip controls Ethernet 1 through Ethernet 32
    • Petra1 chip controls Ethernet 33 through Ethernt 52

      switch#show platform petraA port-info routing
      Petra0 Port Routing Information:
      ========================================================================
       sys fap routing
       intfNameport-id port-id intfTypeportType v4 v6
      ========================================================================
       CpuTm 2 0Cpu Tm11
       
       Ethernet129 2Nif Ethernet11
       Ethernet230 3Nif Ethernet11
      
       Ethernet31 5932Nif Ethernet11
       Ethernet32 6033Nif Ethernet11
      
       RawPetra0/70211870Recycling Raw 11
      Petra1 Port Routing Information:
      ========================================================================
       sys fap routing
       intfNameport-id port-id intfTypeportType v4 v6
      ========================================================================
       CpuTm 2 0Cpu Tm11
      
       Ethernet33 66 2Nif Ethernet11
      
       Ethernet52 8521Nif Ethernet11
       L3SecondHop1Petra1 8622Recycling Ethernet11
      
       RawPetra1/70211870Recycling Raw 11
      switch#
      

Petra Modular Switches

Linecards on 7500-Series modular switches distribute Ethernet ports among multiple petraA chips. The show platform petraA port-info routing command displays the ports that are controlled by each chip on all PetraA linecards or on a single linecard.

Example

  • This command displays the following Ethernet port distribution on linecard 4 of a DCS-7504 switch:

    • Petra4/0 chip controls Ethernet 4/1 through Ethernet 4/8
    • Petra4/1 chip controls Ethernet 4/9 through Ethernet 4/16
    • Petra4/2 chip controls Ethernet 4/17 through Ethernet 4/24
    • Petra4/3 chip controls Ethernet 4/25 through Ethernet 4/32
    • Petra4/4 chip controls Ethernet 4/33 through Ethernet 4/40
    • Petra4/5 chip controls Ethernet 4/41 through Ethernet 4/48

      switch(s1)#show platform petra module 4 port-info routing
      Petra4/0 Port Routing Information:
      ========================================================================
       sys fap routing
       intfNameport-id port-id intfTypeportType v4 v6
      ========================================================================
       CpuTm 2 0Cpu Tm10
      
       Ethernet4/1 221 2Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/2 222 3Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/3 223 4Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/4 224 5Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/5 225 6Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/6 226 7Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/7 227 8Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/8 228 9Nif Ethernet10
      
       RawPetra4/0/70211870Recycling Raw 10
      Petra4/1 Port Routing Information:
      ========================================================================
       sys fap routing
       intfNameport-id port-id intfTypeportType v4 v6
      ========================================================================
       CpuTm 2 0Cpu Tm10
      
       Ethernet4/9 253 2Nif Ethernet10
      
      Petra4/5 Port Routing Information:
      ========================================================================
       sys fap routing
       intfNameport-id port-id intfTypeportType v4 v6
      ========================================================================
      
       Ethernet4/41381 2Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/42382 3Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/43383 4Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/44384 5Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/45385 6Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/46386 7Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/47387 8Nif Ethernet10
       Ethernet4/48388 9Nif Ethernet10
      
      switch(s1)#
      

Arad Modular Switches

7500-E Series linecards distribute Ethernet ports among multiple Arad chips. The show platform arad port-info routing command displays the ports that are controlled by each chip on all Arad linecards.

Example

  • This command displays the following Ethernet port distribution on the 7500E-72S-LC linecard that is inserted as module 3 in a DCS-7508E switch:

    • Arad3/0 chip: Ethernet 3/1– Ethernet 3/20
    • Arad3/1 chip: Ethernet 3/21 – Ethernet 3/34 and Ethernet 3/49/1 – Ethernet 3/49/12
    • Arad3/2 chip: Ethernet 3/35 – Ethernet 3/48 and Ethernet 3/50/1 – Ethernet 3/50/12

      switch#show platform arad mapping
      
      Arad3/0PortSysPhyPort Voq(Fap,FapPort) 
      XlgeSerdes
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
       CpuTm232(0,0) n/a n/a
      
       Ethernet3/1 28 240(0,2) n/a (16)
       Ethernet3/2 29 248(0,3) n/a (17)
       Ethernet3/3 30 256(0,4) n/a (18)
       Ethernet3/4 31 264(0,5) n/a (19)
       Ethernet3/5 32 272(0,6) n/a (20)
       Ethernet3/6 33 280(0,7) n/a (21)
       Ethernet3/7 34 288(0,8) n/a (22)
       Ethernet3/8 35 296(0,9) n/a (23)
       Ethernet3/9 36 304(0, 10) n/a (24)
       Ethernet3/1037 312(0, 11) n/a (25)
       Ethernet3/1138 320(0, 12) n/a (26)
       Ethernet3/1239 328(0, 13) n/a (27)
       Ethernet3/1340 336(0, 14) n/a (4)
       Ethernet3/1441 344(0, 15) n/a (5)
       Ethernet3/1542 352(0, 16) n/a (6)
       Ethernet3/1643 360(0, 17) n/a (7)
       Ethernet3/1744 368(0, 18) n/a (0)
       Ethernet3/1845 376(0, 19) n/a (1)
       Ethernet3/1946 384(0, 20) n/a (2)
       Ethernet3/2047 392(0, 21) n/a (3)
       
       RawArad3/0/56 2104 16848(0, 56) n/a n/a
      
      Arad3/1PortSysPhyPort Voq(Fap,FapPort) 
      XlgeSerdes
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      -----
      
       Ethernet3/2160 496(1,2) n/a (16)
      
       Ethernet3/3473 600(1, 15) n/a (13)
       Ethernet3/49/174 608(1, 16) n/a (0)
       
       Ethernet3/49/12 85 696(1, 27) n/a (11)
       
      
      Arad3/2PortSysPhyPort Voq(Fap,FapPort) 
      XlgeSerdes
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      -----
      
       Ethernet3/3592 752(2,2) n/a (16)
      
       Ethernet3/48 105 856(2, 15) n/a (13)
       Ethernet3/50/1 106 864(2, 16) n/a (0)
      
       Ethernet3/50/12117 952(2, 27) n/a (11)
      
      switch#

Trident II Fixed Switches

Trident II platform devices distribute their ports among multiple Trident II chips. The show platform trident system port command displays the ports that are controlled by each chip.

Example

  • This command displays the following Ethernet port distribution on a DCS-7250QX-64-F switch:

    • Trident 0 chip controls Ethernet 1/1 through Ethernet 16/4
    • Trident 1 chip controls Ethernet 17/1 through Ethernet 32/4
    • Trident 2 chip controls Ethernet 33/1 through Ethernet 48/4
    • Trident 3 chip controls Ethernet 49/1 through Ethernet 64/4

      switch#show platform trident system port
      
      Port
      IntfChip ModId Logical PhysicalMMU
      --------------------- ----------------- ----------- ------------- ---------- ---
       Ethernet1/1 Linecard0/0 1 1 179
       Ethernet1/2 Linecard0/0 1 2 18 10
      
      Ethernet16/3 Linecard0/0 160107 98
      Ethernet16/4 Linecard0/0 161108 99
      
      Ethernet64/2 Linecard0/3 462106 97
      Ethernet64/3 Linecard0/3 463107 98
      Ethernet64/4 Linecard0/3 464108 99
      
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      switch#

Trident II Modular Switches

Linecards on 7300-Series modular switches distribute Ethernet ports among multiple Trident II chips. The show platform trident system port command can display the ports that are controlled by each chip on all linecards or on a single chip.

  • This command displays the following Ethernet port distribution on DCS-7304-F switch that contains a 7300X-32Q-LC linecard as module 3:

    • Trident 0 chip controls Ethernet 1/1 through Ethernet 16/4 (on module 3)
    • Trident 1 chip controls Ethernet 17/1 through Ethernet 32/4 (on module 3)

      switch#show platform trident system port
      
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Port
      IntfChip ModId Logical PhysicalMMU
      --------------------- ----------------- ----------- ------------- ----------------
       Ethernet3/1/1 Linecard3/0 5 1 174
       Ethernet3/2/1 Linecard3/0 5 2 215
      
      Ethernet3/16/3 Linecard3/0 551111102
      Ethernet3/16/4 Linecard3/0 552112103
      
      Ethernet3/32/3 Linecard3/1 663111102
      Ethernet3/32/4 Linecard3/1 664112103
      
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      
      switch#

Command Modes

Command modes define the user interface state. Each mode is associated with commands that perform a specific set of network configuration and monitoring tasks.

Mode Types

The switch includes these command modes:

  • EXEC: EXEC mode commands display system information, perform basic tests, connect to remote devices, and change terminal settings. When logging into eos, you enter EXEC mode.

EXEC mode prompt: switch>

  • Privileged EXEC: Privileged EXEC mode commands configure operating and global parameters. The list of Privileged EXEC commands is a superset of the EXEC command set. You can configure eos to require password access to enter Privileged EXEC from EXEC mode.

Privileged EXEC mode prompt: switch#

  • Global Configuration: Global Configuration mode commands configure features that affect the entire system, such as system time or the switch name.

Global Configuration mode prompt: switch(config)#

  • Interface Configuration: Interface configuration mode commands configure or enable Ethernet, VLAN, and Port-Channel interface features.

Interface Configuration mode prompt: switch(config-if-Et24)#

  • Protocol specific mode: Protocol specific mode commands modify global protocol settings. Protocol specific mode examples include ACL Configuration and Router BGP Configuration.

The prompt indicates the active command mode. For example, the Router BGP command prompt is switch(config-router-bgp)#

Navigating Through Command Modes

To change the active command mode, perform one of these actions:

  • To enter EXEC mode, log into the switch.
  • To enter Privileged EXEC mode from EXEC, type enable (or en) followed, if prompted, by the enable password:

    switch>en
    Password:
    switch#
    
  • To enter Global Configuration mode from Privileged EXEC, type configure (or config):

    switch#config
    switch(config)#
    
  • To enter Interface Configuration mode from Global Configuration, type interface and the name of the interface to be modified:

    switch(config)#interface Et24
    switch(config-if-Et24)#
    
  • To enter a protocol specific configuration mode from Global Configuration, type the required command for the desired mode.

    switch(config)#router bgp 100
    switch(config-router-bgp)#
    
  • To return one level from any configuration mode, type exit.

    switch(config)#exit
    switch#
    
  • To return to Privileged EXEC mode from any configuration mode, type end or Ctrl-Z.

    switch(config-if-Et24)#<Ctrl-z>
    switch#
    
  • To return to EXEC mode from Privileged EXEC mode, type disable (or dis).

    switch#dis
    switch>
    
  • To exit eos and log out of the CLI, type exit from EXEC mode or Privileged EXEC mode.

    switch#exit
    
    login:
    

Command Mode Hierarchy

Command modes are hierarchical. The parent mode of a specified command mode is the mode that contains the command that enters the specified mode.

Example

  • EXEC mode contains the enable command, which enters Privileged EXEC mode. Therefore, EXEC is the parent mode of Privileged EXEC.

Commands that are executable in a specified command mode include all commands available in the specified mode plus all commands executable from its parent mode.

Example

  • EXEC mode includes the ping command. EXEC mode is the parent mode of Privileged EXEC mode. Therefore, Privileged EXEC mode includes ping.

Additionally, Privileged EXEC is the parent mode of Global Configuration mode. Therefore, Global Configuration mode also includes ping.

Executing a configuration mode command from a child mode may change the active command mode.

Example

  • Global Configuration mode contains interface ethernet and ip access-list commands, which enter Interface Configuration and Access Control List (ACL) Configuration modes, respectively. When the switch is in Interface Configuration mode, the ip access-list command is available and changes the active mode to ACL Configuration.

    switch(config)#interface ethernet 1
    switch(config-if-Et1)#ip access-list master-list
    switch(config-acl-master-list)#
    

The exit command changes the active command mode to its parent mode. When executed from Privileged EXEC or EXEC modes, the exit command terminates the session.

Example

  • This command exits Global Configuration mode to Privileged EXEC mode.

    switch(config)#exit
    switch#
    
  • This command terminates the user session.

    switch#exit
    

Group-Change Configuration Modes

Group-change modes apply all changes made during an edit session only after exiting the mode. Changes are stored when the user exits the mode, either through an exit or end command or through a command that enters a different configuration mode.

The abort command discards all changes not previously applied.

Access Control List (ACL) and Multiple Spanning Tree (MST) configuration modes are examples of group-change modes.

Managing Switch Configuration Settings

Verifying Settings for the Current Mode

To display only the lines of running-config that affect the current mode, use the active option of the show (various configuration modes) command. This command option is available in all configuration modes except global configuration.

Example

Type show active to display the content of running-config that affects the current mode. To include default settings in the display, type show active all.
switch(config-router-ospf3)#show active all
ipv6 router ospf 9
   router-id 0.0.0.0
   default-metric 10
   distance ospf intra-area 10
   area 0.0.0.200 default-cost 10
   area 0.0.0.200
   no log-adjacency-changes
   timers spf 5
switch(config-router-ospf3)#

To display any comments associated with the current mode, use the comment option of the show (various configuration modes) command.

Example

Type show comment to display any comments attached to the current mode.
switch(config-router-ospf3)#show comment
Comment for router-ospf3:
    Consult Thomas Morton before making changes to the OSPF configuration.
switch(config-router-ospf3)#

Verifying the Running Configuration Settings

running-config is the virtual file that stores the operating configuration. The show running-config command displays the running-config . The command is supported in Privileged EXEC mode.

Example

  • Type show running-config in Privileged EXEC mode. The response in the example is truncated to display only the ip route configured.

    switch#show running-config 
    ! Command: show running-config
    
    !
    ip route 0.0.0.0/0 192.0.2.1
    !
    
    end
    switch#
    

Adding a Comment to a Configuration Mode

To add a comment to most switch configuration modes, use the comment (various configuration modes)command. Comments cannot be modified, but can be replaced by entering the comment command again and entering new text. Comments cannot be added to global configuration mode

To append to an existing comment, enter !! followed by additional comment text. To display comments for the active mode, use the show comment command. The no comment and default comment commands remove the comment from running-config .

Examples

  • These commands enter a comment in Router OSPF3 Mode.

    switch(config-router-ospf3)#comment
    Enter TEXT message. Type 'EOF' on its own line to end.
    Consult Thomas Morton before making changes to the OSPF configuration.
    EOF
    switch(config-router-ospf3)#
  • These commands append additional information to the comment entered above.

    switch(config-router-ospf3)#!! x2735
    switch(config-router-ospf3)#show comment
    Comment for router-ospf3:
        Consult Thomas Morton before making changes to the OSPF configuration.
        x2735
    switch(config-router-ospf3)#

Saving the Running Configuration Settings

startup-config is the file, stored in internal flash memory, that the switch loads when it boots. Configuration changes that are not saved to startup-config are lost the next time the switch is booted.

The write and copy running-config startup-config commands store the operating configuration to startup-config.Both commands are supported in Privileged EXEC mode.

Example

These equivalent commands save the current operating configure to the startup-config file.
switch#write

switch#copy running-config startup-config

The show startup-config command displays the startup configuration file. The command is supported in Privileged EXEC mode.

Example

Type show startup-config to display the startup configuration file. The response in the example is truncated to display only the ip route configured in Admin Username.
switch#show startup-config
! Command: show startup-config
! Startup-config last modified atWed Feb 19 08:34:31 2014 by admin
!

!
ip route 0.0.0.0/0 192.0.2.1
!

end
switch#

Other Command-Line Interfaces

eos can access other CLIs that provide switch commands, files, and services. .

Aboot Command-Line Interface

Aboot is the switch boot loader. It reads a configuration file from the internal flash or a USB flash drive and attempts to boot a software image.

The switch opens an Aboot shell if the switch does not find a software image, the configuration is corrupted, or the user terminates the boot process. The Aboot shell provides a CLI for manually booting a software image, recovering the internal flash to its default factory state, running hardware diagnostics, and managing files.

Bash Shell

The switch provides a Linux Bash shell for accessing the underlying Linux operating system and extensions. The Bash shell is accessible in all command modes except EXEC. Mode Types describes EOC command modes.

  • To enter the Bash, type bash at the prompt.

    switch#bash
    
    Arista Networks eos shell
    
    [admin@Switch ~]$
    
  • To exit the Bash, type logout, exit, or Ctrl-D at the Bash prompt.

    [admin@Switch ~]$ logout
    switch# 
    

Directory Structure

eos operates from a flash drive root mounted as the /mnt/flash directory on the switch. The eos CLI supports these file and directory commands:

  • delete: Delete a file or directory tree.
  • copy: Copy a file.
  • more: Display the file contents.
  • diff: Compares the contents of files located at specified URLs.
  • rename: Rename a file
  • cd: Change the current working directory.
  • dir: Lists directory contents, including files and subdirectories.
  • mkdir: Create a directory.
  • rmdir: Remove a directory.
  • pwd: Display the current working directory.

Verify flash memory space before copying a file. When a file is copied to flash, it is first written to a temporary file and then renamed to the destination rather than directly overwriting the destination file. This protects the integrity of the existing file if the copy command is interrupted, but requires more free space to complete the process.

Switch directory files are accessible through the Bash shell and Aboot. When entering the Bash shell from the switch, the working directory is located in /home and has the name of the user name from which Bash was entered.

Example

  • These commands were entered from the user name john:

    switch#bash
    [john@switch ~]$ pwd
    /home/john
    [john@switch ~]$ 
    

In this instance, the working directory is /home/john

When a flash drive is inserted in the USB flash port, flash drive contents are accessible through /mnt/usb1.

When entering Aboot, the working directory is the root directory of the boot.

Command-Line Interface Commands

action bash

The action bash command specifies a Bash shell command to be run when an event handler is triggered. When an event handler is triggered, execution of the associated shell command is delayed by a configurable period set by the delay command. Only a single Bash command may be configured for an event handler, but the command may have multiple arguments. If more than one Bash command must be executed in response to a trigger, create a script containing the desired commands and enter the file path to the script as the argument of the action bash command.

To specify the event that will trigger the action, use the trigger command.

If the event handler uses an on-intf trigger, the following environment variables are passed to the action and can be used as arguments to the Bash command:

  • $INTF     interface name.

    • $OPERSTATE     current operational status of the specified interface.
    • $IP-PRIMARY     current primary IP address of the specified interface.

Event-Handler Configuration

Command Syntax

action bash command

Parameters

  • command     Bash shell command to be executed when the event handler is triggered.

Examples

  • This command configures the event handler “onStartup” to run a script on the flash drive.

    switch(config-handler-onStartup)#action bash /mnt/flash/myScript1
    switch(config-handler-onStartup)#
  • This command configures the event handler “eth_4” to send email to the specified address when there is a change in the operational status of Ethernet interface 4.

    switch(config-event-eth_4)#action bash email x@yz.com -s "Et4 $OPERSTATE"
    switch(config-event-eth_4)#

The above action uses the $OPERSTATE variable to include the current operational state (“linkup” or “linkdown”) in the subject of the email. Note that the action will only function if email has been configured on the switch.

alias

The alias command creates an alias for a CLI command. Entering the alias in the CLI executes the corresponding command. Once created, an alias is accessible in all modes and all user sessions, but is subject to all the restrictions of the original command.

When using a command alias, no tokens may precede the alias except the no and default keywords. However, an alias can incorporate positional parameters.

In online help, aliases are preceded by an asterisk (*) in this format:

*alias_name=command_name

The no alias and default alias commands remove the specified alias.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

alias alias_name command_name

no alias alias_name

default alias alias_name

Parameters

  • alias_name     the string which is to be substituted for the original command. The string can include letters, numbers, and punctuation, but no spaces. If the alias_name string is identical to an existing command, the alias will supercede the original command.
  • command_name     the command which is to be executed when the alias is entered in the CLI. If the original command requires additional parameters, they must be included in the command_name string in the following manner:

Positional parameters are of the form “%n” and must be whitespace-delimited. The first parameter is represented by “%1” and any additional parameters must be numbered sequentially. When executing the alias a value must be entered for each parameter or the CLI will display the error “% incomplete command”.

Examples

  • This command makes e an alias for the command enable.

    switch(config)#alias e enable
  • This command makes srie an alias for the command show running-config interface ethernet 1-6.

    switch(config)#alias srie show running-config interface ethernet 1-6
  • These commands make ss an alias for the command show interfaces ethernet <range> status with a positional parameter for the port range, then use the alias to display the status of ports 4/1-4/5.

    switch(config)#alias ss show interfaces ethernet %1 status
    switch(config)#ss 4/1-4/5
    Port      Name            Status       Vlan       Duplex  Speed Type
    Et4/1                     connected    in Po1       full  10000 10GBASE-SRL
    Et4/2                     notconnect   in Po1       full  10000 10GBASE-SRL
    Et4/3                     notconnect   1            full  10000 10GBASE-SRL
    Et4/4                     notconnect   1            full  10000 10GBASE-SRL
    Et4/5                     notconnect   1            full  10000 10GBASE-SRL
    

bash

The bash command starts the Linux Bash shell. The Bash shell gives you access to the underlying Linux operating system and system extensions.

To exit the Bash, type logout, exit, or Ctrl-D at the Bash prompt.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

bash

Examples

  • This command starts the Bash shell.

    switch#bash
    
    Arista Networks eos shell
    
    [admin@switch ~]$ 
  • This command, executed within Bash, exits the Bash shell.

    [admin@switch ~]$ logout
    switch#

comment (various configuration modes)

The comment command adds a comment for the active configuration mode to running-config. Comments cannot be modified, but can be replaced by entering the comment command again and entering new text. To append to an existing comment, enter !! followed by additional comment text. To display comments, use the comment option of the show (various configuration modes) command.

The no comment and default comment commands remove the comment from running-config.

Comments cannot be added to the global configuration mode through the eos.

Command Mode

All configuration modes except Global Configuration

Command Syntax

comment comment_text EOF

no comment

default comment !! comment_text

Parameters

  • comment_text     To create a comment, enter a message when prompted. The message may span multiple lines.
  • EOF     To end a comment, type EOF on its own line (case sensitive) and press enter.

Example

  • This command adds a comment to the active configuration mode.

    switch(config-sg-radius-RAD-SV1)#comment
    Enter TEXT message. Type 'EOF' on its own line to end.
    Consult Thomas Morton before making changes to the RADIUS configuration.
    EOF
    switch(config-sg-radius-RAD-SV1)#
  • This command appends a line to the comment for the active configuration mode.

    switch(config-sg-radius-RAD-SV1)#!! x3452
    switch(config-sg-radius-RAD-SV1)#

configure (configure terminal)

The configure command places the switch in the Global Configuration mode to configure features at the system level. You can move to Interface Configuration mode and protocol-specific mode from the Global Configuration mode. The command may also be entered as configure terminal.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

configure [terminal]

Example

  • This command places the switch in the Global Configuration mode.

    switch>enable 
    switch#configure 
    switch(config)#

configure checkpoint

The configure checkpoint command saves the running configuration to a checkpoint file. This checkpoint file can be used for restoring the current running configuration in future, if required.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

configure checkpoint {restore checkpoint_name | save [checkpoint_name]}

Parameters

  • restore checkpoint_name     restores the running configuration from the specified checkpoint file.
  • save checkpoint_name     saves running configuration to the specified checkpoint file.

Guidelines

If the filename already exists, eos overwrites the filename. If the command is entered without a checkpoint name, the switch automatically saves the checkpoint under the name ckp-date-number where date is the date in YYYYMMDD format and number increments by one for each automatically named checkpoint file.

Examples

  • This command saves running-config to the ca_test checkpoint file.

    switch#configure checkpoint save ca_test
  • This command restores the running-config from the ca_test checkpoint file.

    switch#configure checkpoint restore ca_test
    ! Preserving static routes. Use 'no ip routing delete-static-routes' to clear
    them.
  • This command saves running-config to the 13Aug2018 checkpoint file. The dir command shows the contents of the checkpoint directory.

    switch#configure checkpoint save
    switch#dir checkpoint:
    Directory of checkpoint:/
    
     -rw-7426 Aug 13 12:00ckp-20180813-17
     -rw-7588 Aug 13 12:10ckp-20180813-18
     -rw-8499 Aug 13 12:13ckp-20180813-19
     -rw-8499 Aug 13 12:13ckp-20180813-20

configure convert

The configure convert command converts the current configuration syntax to the specified syntax.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

configure convert new-syntax

Parameter

new-syntax  converts running-config to the current version of eos.

Example:

This command converts running-config to the current version of eos.
switch#configure convert new-syntax

WARNING!
Converting existing configuration to new syntax will lose backward compatibility.
Make sure you won't downgrade to releases that only support the old syntaxes.

Proceed [ y/n ]

configure network

The configure network command is deprecated. Use the copy <url> running-config command to configure the switch from a local file or network location.

copy running-config

The current operating configuration of the switch is stored in a virtual file called running-config. The copy running-config command saves the contents of the running-config virtual file to a new location.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

copy running-config DESTINATION

Parameters

  • DESTINATION     destination for the contents of the running-config file. Values include:

    • startup-config    the configuration file that the switch loads when it boots.

The copy running-config, startup-config, and write commands are equivalent.

  • file:     a file in the switch file directory.

  • flash:     a file in flash memory.

  • url     any valid URL.

The copy running-config url and write network url commands are equivalent.

Examples

  • This command copies running-config to the startup-config file.

    switch#copy running-config startup-config
    switch#
  • This command copies running-config to a file called rc20110617 in the dev subdirectory of the switch directory.

    switch#copy running-config file:dev/rc20110617
    switch#

daemon

The daemon command accesses daemon configuration mode for adding or removing external daemons and scripts, which are then managed by ProcMgr.

The no daemon and default daemon commands delete the deamon by removing the corresponding daemon command from running-config.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

daemon daemon_name

no daemon daemon_name

default daemon daemon_name

Parameters

  • daemon_name     label that references the daemon configuration mode.

Example

These commands enters daemon configuration mode and initiates the daemon script.
switch(config)#daemon process1
switch(config-daemon-process1)#command process-script -i -m
switch(config-daemon-process1)#

delay

The delay command specifies the time in seconds the system will delay between a triggering event and the execution of an event handler action. The default delay is 20 seconds.

Command Mode

Event-Handler Configuration

Command Syntax

delay seconds

Parameters

seconds     number of seconds to delay before executing the action. The default is 20.

Example

This command configures the event handler Eth5 to delay 10 seconds before executing.
switch(config-handler-Eth5)#delay 10
switch(config-handler-Eth5)#

dir

The dir command displays a list of files on a file system.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

dir [SCOPE][FILE TYPE]

Parameters

  • SCOPE     the files to display. Options include

    • <no parameter>     lists normal files in current directory.
    • /all    list all files, including hidden files.
    • /recursive     list files recusively.
  • FILE TYPE     The options include:

    • <no parameter>     lists undeleted files.
    • all_filesystems      list files on all filesystems including deleted files, undeleted files, and files with errors.
    • extensions     directory or file name.
    • file     directory or file name.
    • flash     directory or file name.
    • supervisor-peer    directory or file name.
    • system     directory or file name.
    • usb1directory or file name.

Example

This command displays the flash directory.
switch# dir flash:
Directory of flash:/

 -rwx 293409892 Oct 23 08:55eos-4.11.0.swi
 -rwx 221274543Sep 6 13:37eos-4.7.5.swi
 -rwx 271453650Sep 4 19:13eos_4.10.1-SSO.swi
 -rwx135168 Dec 311979FSCK0000.REC
 -rwx26 Oct 23 13:51boot-config
 -rwx8570 Sep 10 12:22cfg_sso_mst
 -rwx5642 Sep 20 10:35config.reset
 drwx4096 Oct 23 13:59debug
 -rwx12 Oct 23 13:56kernel-params
 drwx4096 Oct 23 14:59persist
 drwx4096Sep 6 14:50schedule
 -rwx5970 Oct 23 13:53startup-config
switch#

disable

The disable command exchanges the session’s current command mode with the specified privilege level.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

disable [PRIVILEGE_LEVEL]

Parameters

PRIVILEGE_LEVEL    Session’s new privilege level. Value ranges from 0 to 15. Levels 2 through 15 place the switch in Privileged EXEC mode. Values of 0 or 1 leave the switch in EXEC mode.
  • <no parameter>     Session is assigned default level of 1.
  • <0 to 15>     Specifies session level.

Restrictions

New privilege level must be less than the session’s current level.

Example

This command exits Privileged EXEC mode level of 15 to enter EXEC mode level 1.
switch# disable
switch>

enable

The enable command places the switch in Privileged EXEC mode. If an enable password is set, the CLI displays a password prompt when a user enters the enable command. If the user enters an incorrect password three times, the CLI displays the EXEC mode prompt.

To set a local enable password, use the enable password command.

Command Mode

EXEC

Command Syntax

enable [PRIVILEGE_LEVEL]

Parameters

  • PRIVILEGE_LEVEL  Session’s privilege level. Values range from 0 to 15. Values of 0 or 1 places the switch in EXEC mode. Any level above 1 leaves the switch in Privileged EXEC mode.

    • <no parameter>     Session is assigned default level of 15.
    • <0 to 15>     Specifies session level.

Example

This command places the switch in Privileged EXEC mode with the default privilege level of 15.
switch>enable
switch#

end

The end command exits to Privileged Exec mode from any Configuration mode. If the switch is in a group-change mode (such as ACL-Configuration mode or MST-Configuration mode), the end command also saves all pending changes made in that mode to running-config.

Command Mode

All configuration modes

Command Syntax

end

Example

This command exits to Privileged Exec mode.
switch(config-if-Et25)#end
switch#

event-handler DropCountersHandler

The event-handler DropCountersHandler command enables the adverse drop counters monitor with event handlers. The DropCountersHandler event handler is enabled by default, and can be customized for duration of time window and threshold levels.

The no event-handler DropCountersHandler command disables the adverse drop counters monitor with event handlers. The default event-handler DropCountersHandler command resets the DropCountersHandler event handler to the system default.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

event-handler DropCountersHandler

no event-handler DropCountersHandler

default event-handler DropCountersHandler

Examples

  • These commands customize the delay, polling interval, and condition for width (-w), violation count (-c), and threshold (-t) of this event handler. Each parameter may be customized separately, with all other parameters remaining unchanged.

    switch(config)#event-handler DropCountersHandler
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler)#action bash DropCounterLog.py -l
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler)#delay 0
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler)#trigger on-counters
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#poll interval 60
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#condition 
    bashCmd."DropCounterMonitor.py" -w 800" > 0
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#condition 
    bashCmd."DropCounterMonitor.py" -c 5" > 0
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#condition 
    bashCmd."DropCounterMonitor.py" -t 200" > 0
    switch(config-DropCountersHandler-counters)#
  • This command disables this event handler.

    switch(config)#no event-handler DropCountersHandler
    switch(config)#

event-handler

An event handler executes a Linux Bash shell command in response to a specific system event. An event handler consists of a Bash command, a trigger and a delay; when the trigger event occurs, the action is scheduled to run after delay seconds.

The event-handler command places the switch in event-handler configuration mode for the specified event handler. If the named event handler does not already exist, this command creates it. Event-handler configuration mode is a group change mode that configures event handlers.

Changes made in a group change mode are saved by leaving the mode through the exit command or by entering another configuration mode.

These commands are available in event-handler configuration mode:

The no event-handler and default event-handler commands delete the specified event handler by removing it from running config.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

event-handler name

no event-handler name

default event-handler name

Parameters

name     name of the event handler to be configured. If the named event handler does not already exist, this command will create it.

Example

This command places the switch in event-handler configuration mode for an event handler called “Eth_5”.
switch(config)#event-handler Eth_5
switch(config-handler-Eth_5)#

exit

The exit command places the switch in the parent of the command mode from which the exit command was entered.

  • When used in Global configuration, the switch enters Privileged EXEC mode.
  • When used in EXEC or Privileged EXEC mode, the exit command terminates the user session.
  • When the command is used in a group-change mode (such as ACL-Configuration mode or MST-Configuration mode), the exit command also applies all pending changes made in that mode.

Command Mode

All modes

Command Syntax

exit

Examples

  • This command exits Global Configuration mode to Privileged EXEC mode.

    switch(config)#exit
    switch#
  • This command terminates the user session.

    switch#exit 

ip ftp client source-interface

By default, the FTP (File Transfer Protocol) source IP address is selected by the switch (the IP address of the source interface if one is assigned). The ip ftp client source-interface command allows the user to override the default FTP source address.

The ip ftp client source-interface and ip ftp source-interface commands are functionally equivalent. In each case, ip ftp client source-interface is stored in running-config.

The no ip ftp client source-interface and default ip ftp client source-interface commands restore default behavior by removing the ip ftp client source-interface statement from running-config.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

ip ftp [client] source-interface INTERFACE [vrf vrf_name]

no ip ftp [client] source-interface

default ip ftp [client] source-interface

Parameters

  • client     Parameter has no functional effect.
  • INTERFACEInterface providing the IP address. Options include:

    • ethernet e_num     Ethernet interface specified by e_num.
    • loopback l_num     Loopback interface specified by l_num.
    • management m_num     Management interface specified by m_num.
    • port-channel p_num     Port-channel interface specified by p_num.
    • tunnel t_num     Tunnel interface specified by t_num.
    • vlan v_num     VLAN interface specified by v_num.
  • vrf vrf_name     Uses the specified user-defined VRF.

Examples

  • These commands configure the 10.10.121.15 as the source IP address the switch uses when communicating with FTP servers.

    switch(config)#interface ethernet 17
    switch(config-if-Et17)#ip address 10.10.121.15/24
    switch(config-if-Et17)#ip ftp client source-interface ethernet 17
    switch(config)#
  • This command configures the switch to use interface tunnel 45 and vrf vrf01 when communicating with FTP servers.

    switch(config)#ip ftp client source-interface tunnel 45 vrf vrf01
    switch(config)#

ip http client local-interface

The ip http client local-interface command specifies the source IP address for hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) connections. By default, the source IP address is selected by the switch when this command is not configured or when the specified interface is not assigned an IP address.

The no ip http client local-interface and default ip http client local-interface commands restore default behavior by removing the ip http client local-interface statement from running-config .

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

ip http client local-interface INTERFACE [vrf vrf_name]

no ip http client local-interface

default ip http client local-interface

Parameters

  • INTERFACE     Interface providing the IP address. Options include:

    • ethernet e_num     Ethernet interface specified by e_num.
    • loopback l_num     Loopback interface specified by l_num.
    • management m_num     Management interface specified by m_num.
    • port-channel p_num     Port-channel interface specified by p_num.
    • vlan v_num     VLAN interface specified by v_num.
  • vrf vrf_name      Uses the specified user-defined VRF.

    Examples

  • These commands configure the 10.15.17.9 as the source IP address the switch uses when communicating with HTTP servers.

    switch(config)#interface vlan 10
    switch(config-if-Vl10)#ip address 10.15.17.9/24
    switch(config-if-Vl10)#ip http client local-interface vlan 10
    switch(config)#
  • This command configures the switch to use interface tunnel 45 and vrf vrf01 when communicating with HTTP servers.

    switch(config)#ip http client local-interface tunnel 45 vrf vrf01
    switch(config)#

ip ssh client source-interface

The ip ssh client source-interface command specifies the source IP address for secure shell (SSH) connections. By default, the source IP address is selected by the switch when this command is not configured or when the specified interface is not assigned an IP address.

The ip ssh client source-interface and ip ssh source-interface commands are functionally equivalent. In each case, ip ssh client source-interface is stored in running-config.

The no ip ssh client source-interface and default ip ssh client source-interface commands restore default behavior by removing the ip ssh client source-interface statement from running-config.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

ip ssh [client] source-interface INTERFACE [vrf vrf_name]

no ip ssh [client] source-interface

default ip ssh [client] source-interface

Parameters

  • client      Parameter has no functional effect.
  • INTERFACEInterface providing the IP address. Options include:

    • ethernet e_num     Ethernet interface specified by e_num.
    • loopback l_num     Loopback interface specified by l_num.
    • management m_num     Management interface specified by m_num.
    • port-channel p_num     Port-channel interface specified by p_num.
    • vlan v_num     VLAN interface specified by v_num.
  • vrf vrf_name      Uses the specified user-defined VRF.

Examples

  • These commands configure the 10.17.17.9 as the source IP address the switch uses when communicating with SSH servers.

    switch(config)#interface vlan 10
    switch(config-if-Vl10)#ip address 10.17.17.9/24
    switch(config-if-Vl10)#ip ssh client source-interface vlan 10
    switch(config)#
  • This command configures the switch to use interface tunnel 45 and vrf vrf01 when communicating with SSH servers.

    switch(config)#ip ssh client source-interface tunnel 45 vrf vrf01
    switch(config)#

ip tftp client source-interface

The ip tftp client source-interface command specifies the source IP address for Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) connections. By default, the source IP address is selected by the switch when this command is not configured or when the specified interface is not assigned an IP address.

The ip tftp client source-interface and ip tftp source-interface commands are functionally equivalent. In each case, ip tftp client source-interface is stored in running-config.

The no ip tftp client source-interface and default ip tftp client source-interface commands restore default behavior by removing the ip tftp client source-interface statement from running-config.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

ip tftp [client] source-interface INTERFACE [vrf vrf_name]

no ip tftp [client] source-interface

default ip tftp [client] source-interface

Parameters

  • client     Parameter has no functional effect.
  • INTERFACE Interface providing the IP address. Options include:

    • ethernet e_num     Ethernet interface specified by e_num.
    • loopback l_num     Loopback interface specified by l_num.
    • management m_num     Management interface specified by m_num.
    • port-channel p_num     Port-channel interface specified by p_num.
    • vlan v_num     VLAN interface specified by v_num.
  • vrf vrf_name     Uses the specified user-defined VRF.

    Examples

  • These commands configure the 10.15.17.9 as the source IP address the switch uses when communicating with TFTP servers.

    switch(config)#interface vlan 10
    switch(config-if-Vl10)#ip address 10.15.17.9/24
    switch(config-if-Vl10)#ip tftp client source-interface vlan 10
    switch(config)#
  • This command configures the switch to use interface tunnel 45 and vrf vrf01 when communicating with TFTP servers.

    switch(config)#ip tftp client source-interface tunnel 45 vrf vrf01
    switch(config)#

platform arad lag mode

The platform arad lag mode command allows configuration of LAGs with more than 16 members.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

platform arad lag mode [1024x16 | 256x64 | 512x32]

Examples

  • This command configures 1024 LAGs with 16 members each.

    switch(config)#platform arad lag mode 1024x16
    ! Change will take effect only after switch reboot.
    switch(config)#
  • This command configures 256 LAGs with 64 members each.

    switch(config)#platform arad lag mode 256x64
    ! Change will take effect only after switch reboot.
    switch(config)#
  • This command configures 512 LAGs with 32 members each.

    switch(config)#platform arad lag mode 512x32
    ! Change will take effect only after switch reboot.
    switch(config)#

platform sand fabric mode (7500 and 7500E Series)

The platform sand fabric mode command specifies the fabric mode under which the switch operates after the next system reload. The command has no operational effect until the switch reloads.

The fabric mode determines the modular switch’s fabric performance capabilities and must be compatibile with the installed fabric modules. Fabric mode settings include:

  • fe600: Supports first-generation fabric modules.

  • fe1600: Supports E-Series fabric modules.

    Note: Switches that reload in petraA forwarding compatibility mode (platform sand forwarding mode (7500 and 7500E Series)) also reload in fe600 fabric mode regardless of the presence of a platform sand fabric mode statement in running-config.

The switch’s fabric mode setting must match the capabilities of its installed fabric modules. Reloading the switch in a different mode may be required after exchanging fabric modules for a different module type. The show module command displays the fabric modules in the switch.

Each fabric module is categorized as first-generation or E-Series:

  • First-generation fabric modules support all basic switch functions.
  • E-Series fabric modules support faster fabric link speeds, greater internal table capacities, and advanced encoding formatting.

E-series fabric modules can operate in fe600 mode, but are limited to first-generation fabric performance. First-generation modules cannot operate in fe600 mode. Switches containing both types of modules must be set to fe600 mode. Best practice is to avoid switch configurations with mixed fabric modules.

When a switch reloads, fabric mode is determined by the following (in order of precedence):

  1. Switches reloading in petraA forwarding compability mode also reload in fe600 fabric mode .
  2. As specified by the platform sand fabric mode statement in running-config.
  3. The first fabric module that becomes operational as the switch reloads.

In switches with a homogeneous module set, the fabric mode matches its fabric modules. Switches with a mixed set of modules are typically reloaded in fe600 mode because first generation modules are usually operational before E-Series modules. However, the fabric mode in mixed module switches that are reloading cannot be guaranteed in the absence of the first two conditions.

 

The no platform sand fabric mode and default platform sand fabric mode commands remove the platform sand fabric mode command from running-config.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

platform sand fabric mode [MODE_SETTING]

no platform sand fabric mode

default platform sand fabric mode

Parameters

  • MODE_SETTING     Specifies the switch’s fabric mode. Options include:

    • fe16000     E-Series fabric mode.

    • fe600     First-generation fabric mode.

Example

This command configures the switch to reload in fe1600 fabric mode to support E-series fabric modules. After issuing this command, the switch should be reset only after exchanging all switch fabric modules to E-series modules.
switch(config)#platform sand fabric mode fe1600
switch(config)#exit
switch#show platform sand compatibility
 ConfigurationStatus
Forwarding modeNone Arad
Fabric modeFe1600 Fe600
switch#

platform sand forwarding mode (7500 and 7500E Series)

The platform sand forwarding mode command specifies the forwarding compatibility mode under which the switch operates after the next system reload. The command has no operational effect until the switch reloads.

Forwarding compatibility mode specifies switch forwarding capabilities and configures performance capacity of installed linecards. Forwarding compatibility modes settings include:

  • petraA: Supports first-generation fabric modules.
  • arad: Supports E-Series fabric modules.

    Note: Switches that reload in petraA forwarding compatibility mode also reload in fe600 fabric mode regardless of the presence of a platform sand fabric mode (7500 and 7500E Series) statement in running-config.

This command may be required after exchanging a linecard for a different module type or in switches containing first-generation and E-series linecards. The show module command displays the linecard modules in the switch.

Each modular switch linecard module is categorized as first-generation or E-Series:

  • First-generation linecards support all basic switch functions.
  • E-Series linecards support provide faster data processing, greater internal table capacities, and advanced encoding formatting.

The forwarding compatibility mode determines the operational capacity of installed linecards. The following table lists the affect of the forwarding compatibility mode on all linecard module types.

Table 3. Linecard Module and Forwarding Mode Performance
Linecard Module Type Forwarding Software Mode Linecard Operating Capacity
First-generation petraA Linecard performs at first-generation performance capacity.
First-generation arad Linecard is powered-down.
E-Series petraA Linecard performs at first-generation performance capacity.
E-Series arad Linecard performs at E-series performance capacity.
Note: Linecards operate at E-Series performance capacities only on switches that contain E-Series fabric modules and have a fabric mode setting of fe1600 fabric mode (platform sand fabric mode (7500 and 7500E Series)).

Without a platform sand fabric mode (7500 and 7500E Series) command, forward compatibility mode is determined by the first linecard that becomes operational after reloading the switch. In a switch that is reloaded with a homogeneous module set, forwarding compatibility mode matches its linecards. Switches with a mixed set of modules are typically reloaded in petraA mode because first generation modules are usually operational before E-Series modules. However, forwarding compatibility mode in mixed module switches that are reloading is not guaranteed without a platform sand forwarding mode command.

The no platform sand forwarding mode and default platform sand forwarding mode commands restore the platform sand forwarding mode command from running-config.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

platform sand forwarding mode [MODE_SETTING]

no platform sand forwarding mode

default platform sand forwarding mode

Parameters
  • MODE_SETTING     Specifies the switch’s software forwarding mode. Options include:

    • arad the switch supports E-Series linecard capabilities.
    • petraA the switch supports first-generation linecard capabilities.

Example

This command changes the forwarding software mode to support E-series linecard modules. This command should be run only after exchanging all linecards to E-series modules.
switch(config)#platform sand forwarding mode arad
switch(config)#

platform sand lag hardware-only

The platform sand lag hardware-only command specifies that all LAGs will use hardware resources including single member LAGs. Hardware resource allocation and deallocation traffic disruption occurs on the first member addition or deletion, rather than the second member addition or deletion.

The no platform sand lag hardware-only and default platform sand lag hardware-only commands specify that LAGs are not required to be implemented in hardware, and therefore some LAGs may be implemented in software. Permitting both hardware and software LAGs may increase the total number of port-channels because we have no resource limit on the number of software LAGs.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

platform sand lag hardware-only

no platform sand lag hardware-only

default platform sand lag hardware-only

Examples

  • This command configures all LAGs to use hardware resources. All existing one member LAGs will be allocated hardware resources, when available.

    switch(config)#platform sand lag hardware-only
    switch(config)#
  • This command allows certain LAGs (single member LAGs) to not consume hardware resources. All existing one member LAGs will release their hardware resources.

    switch(config)#no platform sand lag hardware-only
    switch(config)#

pwd

The pwd command displays the working directory.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

pwd

Example

This command shows that the working is Flash.
switch# pwd
flash:/
switch#

schedule config

The schedule config command sets configuration parameters to the CLI scheduler.

The no schedule config max-concurrent-jobs and default schedule config max-concurrent-jobs commands reset the limit of maximum concurrent jobs to the default value of 1 by removing the corresponding schedule config max-concurrent-jobs statement from running-config.

The no schedule config prepend-hostname-logfile and default schedule config prepend-hostname-logfile commands reset the log filenames to the default state.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

schedule config{max-concurrent-jobs limit | prepend-hostname-logfile}

no schedule config {max-concurrent-jobs limit | prepend-hostname-logfile}

default schedule config {max-concurrent-jobs limit | prepend-hostname-logfile}

Parameters

  • max-concurrent-jobs limit     specifies the maximum number of concurrent commands that can run on the switch. The maximum concurrent jobs ranges from 1 to 4. The default value is 1.
  • prepend-hostname-logfile     enables prepending hostnames to log filenames. By default, this option is enabled.

Examples

  • This command configures to concurrently run a maximum of three commands on the switch.

    switch(config)#schedule config max-concurrent-jobs 3
    switch(config)#show schedule summary
    Maximum concurrent jobs3
    Prepend host name to logfile: No
    NameAt timeLastInterval Timeout Max Logfile Location 
    Status
     time (mins)(mins)log
     files
    ------------- ------------- ------- ---------- -------- -------- ------------------------------- ------
    tech-supportnow00:296030100 flash:schedule/tech-support/ Success
    thelp 12:02:00 00:026040100 flash:schedule/thelp/
    Fail
    06/05/2018
    switch(config)#
  • This command enables prepending the hostname to log filenames.

    switch(config)#schedule config prepend-hostname-logfile
    switch(config)#show schedule summary
    Maximum concurrent jobs3
    Prepend host name to logfile: Yes
    NameAt timeLastInterval Timeout Max Logfile Location 
    Status
     time (mins)(mins)log
     files
    ------------- ------------- ------- ---------- -------- -------- ------------------------------- ------
    tech-supportnow00:296030100 flash:schedule/tech-support/ Success
    thelp 12:02:00 00:026040100 flash:schedule/thelp/
    Fail
    06/05/2018
    switch(config)#

schedule

The schedule command facilitates the periodic execution of a specified CLI command. Command parameters configure the start time of periodic execution, the interval between consecutive execution instances, the maximum time allotted for command execution, and the maximum number of log files that can be created.

The no schedule and default schedule commands disable execution of the specified command.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

schedule schedule_name PERIOD {max-log-files count | timeout timeout_interval}{command cmd | logging verbose | loglocation flash:}

no schedule schedule_name

default schedule schedule_name

Parameters
  • schedule_name      Label associated with the scheduled command.
  • PERIOD      Start time for execution and interval between consecutive execution instances. The interval ranges from 2 to 1440 minutes. The default interval while scheduling the show tech-support command is 60 minutes. Options include:

    • at      Start time for execution. Options include:

      • hh:mm:ss interval interval      The command execution starts at the specified time and repeats at the specified interval.
      • hh:mm:ss mm/dd/yyyy interval interval      The command execution starts at the specified time on the specified day and repeats at the specified interval.
      • hh:mm:ss once      The command execution starts at the specified time and does not repeat.
      • hh:mm:ss mm/dd/yyyy once      The command execution starts at the specified time on the specified day and does not repeat.
      • hh:mm:ss yyyy-mm-dd interval interval      The command execution starts at the specified time on the specified day and repeats at the specified interval.
      • hh:mm:ss yyyy-mm-dd once      The command execution starts at the specified time on the specified day and does not repeat.
    • interval interval      The command execution starts immediately and repeats at the specified interval.
    • now interval interval      The command execution starts immediately and repeats at the specified interval.
  • max-log-files count      Maximum number of log files command generates for command output. The count of maximum log files ranges from 1 to 10000. The default count of maximum log files while scheduling the show tech-support command is 100.
  • timeout timeout_interval      Maximum time allotted for the script execution. The timeout interval ranges from 1 to 480 minutes. The default timeout is 30 minutes.

    Note: The command execution is terminated if it exceeds the specified timeout interval. The timeout allotted for the scheduled command must not be greater than the corresponding interval.
  • command cmd      The command that needs to be executed.
  • logging verbose      Sets the logging level to “verbose.” A syslog entry is added after the execution of the scheduled command, regardless of whether the scheduled command has succeeded or failed. In the absence of logging verbose, the syslog entry is added only if the execution of the scheduled command fails with an error.
  • loglocation destination      The flash destination for scheduled command output files.

Guidelines

Log files created by the command are stored in the flash:/schedule/ scheduled_name / directory. Empty log files are created for commands that do not generate any output.

Examples

  • This command saves the running configuration contents to the log file every hour with immediate effect and creates a maximum of 24 log files.
    switch(config)#schedule backup-test interval 60 max-log-files 24 command show running-config
  • This command starts the script execution at 12:00:00 and repeats every 720 minutes. The script execution is terminated if it exceeds 20 minutes. It generates a maximum of one log file because the specified bash command does not have an output.
    switch(config)#schedule ms1 at 12:00:00 interval 720 timeout 20 max-log-files 1 command bash /mnt/flash/myscript.sh
  • The show schedule command lists the commands currently scheduled for periodic execution and displays the summary of the specified scheduled command.
    switch#show schedule summary
    Maximum concurrent jobs1
    Prepend host name to logfile: Yes
    
    Name At time LastInterval TimeoutMaxLogfile LocationStatus
     time(mins) (mins) log 
     files
    ---- ------- ----- -------- -------- ------ --------------------------
    ms1 now23:03 720 201flash:/schedule/ms1 Success
    
    switch#

show (various configuration modes)

The show command, when executed within a configuration mode, can display data in running-config for the active configuration mode.

Command Mode

All configuration modes except Global Configuration

Command Syntax

show [DATA_TYPE]

Parameters
  • DATA_TYPE     Specifies display contents. Values include:

    • active     Displays running-config settings for the configuration mode.
    • active all     Displays running-config plus defaults for the configuration mode.
    • active all detail     Displays running-config plus defaults for the configuration mode.
    • comment     Displays comment entered for the configuration mode.

Related Commands

The show commands in ACL-configuration mode and MST-configuration mode include the active and comment options along with additional mode-specific options.

Example

This command shows the server-group-TACACS+ configuration commands in running-config.
switch(config-sg-tacacs+-TAC-GR)#show active
   server TAC-1
   server 10.1.4.14
switch(config-sg-tacacs+-TAC-GR)#

show event-handler DropCountersHandler

The show event-handler command displays details of the DropCountersHandler event handler.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

show event-handler DropCountersHandler

Example

This command displays details of this event handler.
switch(config)#show event-handler DropCountersHandler
Event-handler DropCountersHandler (BUILT-IN)
Trigger: on-counters delay 0 seconds
Polling Interval: 60 seconds
Condition: bashCmd."DropCounterMonitor.py" > 0
Threshold Time Window: 0 Seconds, Event Count: 1 times
Action: DropCounterLog.py -l
Action expected to finish in less than 20 seconds
Total Polls: 39
Last Trigger Detection Time: 38 minutes 22 seconds ago
Total Trigger Detections: 1
Last Trigger Activation Time: 38 minutes 22 seconds ago
Total Trigger Activations: 1
Last Action Time: Never
Total Actions: 1

switch(config)#

show event-handler

The show event-handler command displays the contents and activation history of a specified event handler or all event handlers.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

show event-handler [handler_name]

Parameters

  • handler_name     optional name of an event handler to display. If no parameter is entered, the command displays information for all event handlers configured on the system.

Example

This command displays information about an event handler called “eth_5”.
switch#show event-handler Eth_5
Event-handler Eth_5
Trigger: on-intf Ethernet5 on ip delay 20 seconds
Threshold Time Window: 0 Seconds, Event Count: 1 times
Action: :
Device-health Action: None
Action expected to finish in less than 10 seconds
Last Trigger Detection Time: 15 days 2 hours 19 minutes ago
Total Trigger Detections: 1
Last Trigger Activation Time: 15 days 2 hours 19 minutes ago
Total Trigger Activations: 1
Last Action Time: 15 days 2 hours 19 minutes ago
Total Actions: 1
switch#

show module

The show module command displays information that identifies the supervisor, fabric, and linecard modules in a modular switch, including model number, serial number, hardware version number, software version (supervisors only), MAC address (supervisors and linecards), and operational status.

Command Mode

EXEC

Command Syntax

show module [MODULE_NAME]

Parameters
  • MODULE_NAME      Specifies modules for which data is displayed. Options include:

    • <no parameter>      All modules (identical to all option).
    • fabric fab_num      Specified fabric module. Number range varies with switch model.
    • linecard line_num      Linecard module. Number range varies with switch model.
    • supervisor super_num      Supervisor module. Number range varies with switch model.
    • mod_num      Supervisor (1 to 2) or linecard (3 to 18) module.
    • all      All modules.

Related Commands

  • show version displays model and serial numbers of modular system components.

Example
  • This command displays information about all installed modules on a DCS-7504 switch.
    switch#show module
    ModulePorts Card TypeModel Serial No.
    --------- ----- ------------------------------------ --------------- -----------
    1 2 DCS-7500 Series Supervisor Module7500-SUPJSH11440327
    2 1 Standby supervisor Unknown Unknown
    3 4848-port SFP+ 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LCJSH10315938
    4 4848-port SFP+ 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LCJSH11665247
    5 4848-port SFP+ 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LCJSH11834614
    6 4848-port SFP+ 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LCJSH11060688
    Fabric1 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11244430
    Fabric2 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11892120
    Fabric3 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11941115
    Fabric4 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11661618
    Fabric5 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11757555
    Fabric6 0 DCS-7504 Fabric Module 7504-FM JSH11847728
    
    ModuleMAC addressesHwSwStatus
    --------- -------------------------------------- ------- ------- -------
    1 00:1c:23:03:06:ac - 00:1c:23:03:06:ac07.06 4.12.1Active
    24.12.1Standby
    3 00:1c:23:03:80:44 - 00:1c:23:03:80:7306.00 Ok
    4 00:1c:23:03:e4:34 - 00:1c:23:03:e4:6307.10 Ok
    5 00:1c:23:12:0b:3f - 00:1c:23:12:0b:6e07.30 Ok
    6 00:1c:23:12:b6:3f - 00:1c:23:12:b6:6e08.00 Ok
    Fabric105.03 Ok
    Fabric205.03 Ok
    Fabric305.02 Ok
    Fabric405.02 Ok
    Fabric505.02 Ok
    Fabric605.02 Ok
    switch#
  • This command displays information about all installed modules on a DCS-7304 switch.
    switch#show module
    ModulePorts Card TypeModel Serial No.
    --------- ----- ------------------------------------ --------------- -----------
    1 3 Supervisor 7300X SSD DCS-7300-SUP-DJAS13340024
    3 128 32 port 40GbE QSFP+ LC 7300X-32Q-LCJPE13440416
    4 6448 port 10GbE SFP+ & 4 port QSFP+ LC 7300X-64S-LCJAS13310113
    5 6448 port 10GbE SFP+ & 4 port QSFP+ LC 7300X-64S-LCJAS13340033
    6 6448 port 10GbE SFP+ & 4 port QSFP+ LC 7300X-64S-LCJAS13310103
    Fabric1 0 7304X Fabric Module7304X-FMJAS13320077
    Fabric2 0 7304X Fabric Module7304X-FMJAS13350043
    Fabric3 0 7304X Fabric Module7304X-FMJAS13350050
    Fabric4 0 7304X Fabric Module7304X-FMJAS13350056
    
    ModuleMAC addressesHwSwStatus
    --------- -------------------------------------- ------- ------- -------
    1 00:1c:73:36:4b:71 - 00:1c:73:36:4b:7201.01 4.13.3F Active
    3 00:1c:73:58:d4:68 - 00:1c:73:58:d4:8703.04 Ok
    4 00:1c:73:36:05:61 - 00:1c:73:36:05:9402.02 Ok
    5 00:1c:73:36:0a:e1 - 00:1c:73:36:0b:1402.03 Ok
    6 00:1c:73:36:02:e1 - 00:1c:73:36:03:1402.02 Ok
    Fabric100.00 Ok
    Fabric200.00 Ok
    Fabric300.00 Ok
    Fabric400.00 Ok
    switch#

show platform sand compatibility

The show sand platform compatibility command displays the fabric and forwarding modes. These modes determine switch forwarding capabilities and programs performance capacity of installed linecards

sinformation that identifies the supervisor, fabric, and linecard modules in the modular switch, including model number, serial number, hardware version number, software version (supervisors only), MAC address (supervisors and linecards), and operational status.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

show platform sand compatibility

Related Commands

Example

This command indicates that the switch is in Fe600 fabric mode and PetraA forwarding mode.
switch#show platform sand compatibility
 ConfigurationStatus
Forwarding modeNone PetraA
Fabric modeNone Fe600
switch#

show platform sand lag hardware-only

The show platform sand lag hardware-only command displays whether or not LAGs are hardware-only.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

show platform sand lag hardware-only

Examples

  • This command indicates that LAGs are hardware-only.

    switch(config)#platform sand lag hardware-only
    switch(config)#exit
    switch#show platform sand lag hardware-only
    Hardware resources are used for all LAGs: True
    switch#
  • This command indicates that LAGs are not hardware-only.

    switch(config)#no platform sand lag hardware-only
    switch(config)#exit
    switch#show platform sand lag hardware-only
    Hardware resources are used for all LAGs: False
    switch#

show schedule

The show schedule command displays logging output on the terminal during the current terminal session. This command affects only the local monitor. The no terminal monitor command disables direct monitor display of logging output for the current terminal session.

The show schedule command displays the list of active scheduled commands and the summary of specified scheduled command.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Command Syntax

show schedule {schedule_name |summary}

Parameters

  • schedule_name    displays the summary of the specified scheduled command
  • summary      displays the list of active scheduled commands

Examples

  • This command displays the summary of the “thelp” schedule.

    switch(config)#show schedule thelp
    The last CLI command failed with exit status 1
    CLI command "show THelp" is scheduled next at "02:02:35 06/19/2018", interval is 
    60 minutes
    Timeout is 40 minutes
    Maximum of 100 log files will be stored
    Verbose logging is off
    100 log files currently stored in flash:/schedule/thelp
    
    Start time SizeFilename
    ----------------------- ---------------- ----------------------------------
    Jun 19 2018 01:02 60.0 bytes ro301_thelp_2018-06-19.0102.log.gz
    Jun 19 2018 00:02 60.0 bytes ro301_thelp_2018-06-19.0002.log.gz
    Jun 18 2018 23:02 60.0 bytes ro301_thelp_2018-06-18.2302.log.gz
    Jun 18 2018 22:02 60.0 bytes ro301_thelp_2018-06-18.2202.log.gz
    Jun 18 2018 21:02 60.0 bytes ro301_thelp_2018-06-18.2102.log.gz
    
    switch(config)#
    
  • This command displays the summary of scheduled commands.

    switch(config)#show schedule summary
    Maximum concurrent jobs1
    Prepend host name to logfile: Yes
    NameAt timeLastInterval Timeout Max Logfile Location 
    Status
     time (mins)(mins)log
     files
    ------------- ------------- ------- ---------- -------- -------- ------------------------------- ------
    tech-supportnow00:296030100 flash:schedule/tech-support/ Success
    thelp 12:02:00 00:026040100 flash:schedule/thelp/
    Fail
    06/05/2018
    switch(config)#

show version

The show version command displays information that identifies the switch, including its model number, serial number, and system MAC address. The command also provides hardware and software manufacturing information, along with the available memory and elapsed time from the most recent reload procedure.

Command Mode

EXEC

Command Syntax

show version [INFO_LEVEL]

Parameters

  • INFO_LEVEL     Specifies information the command displays. Options include

    • <no parameter>      Model and serial numbers, manufacturing data, uptime, and memory.
    • detail     Data listed <no parameter> option plus version numbers of internal components.

Related Command

show module displays model and serial numbers of modular system components.

Example

This command displays the switch’s model number, serial number, hardware and software manufacturing information, uptime, and memory capacity.
switch>show version 
Arista DCS-7150S-64-CL-F
Hardware version:01.01
Serial number: JPE13120819
System MAC address:001c.7326.fd0c

Software image version: 4.13.2F
Architecture: i386
Internal build version: 4.13.2F-1649184.4132F.2
Internal build ID:eeb3c212-b4bd-4c19-ba34-1b0aa36e43f1

Uptime: 1 hour and 36 minutes
Total memory: 4017088 kB
Free memory:1473280 kB

switch>

terminal length

The terminal length command overrides automatic pagination and sets pagination length for all show commands on a terminal. If the output of a show command is longer than the configured terminal length, the output will be paused after each screenful of output, prompting the user to continue.

To disable pagination for an SSH session, set terminal length to 0. By default, all console sessions have pagination disabled.

The no terminal length and default terminal length commands restore automatic pagination by removing the terminal length command from running-config.

The pagination setting is persistent if configured from Global Configuration mode. If configured from EXEC mode, the setting applies only to the current CLI session. Pagination settings may also be overridden when you adjust the size of the SSH terminal window, but can be reconfigured by running the terminal length command again.

Command Mode

EXEC

Command Syntax

terminal length lines

no terminal length

default terminal length

Parameters

lines     number of lines to be displayed at a time. Values range from 0 through 32767. A value of 0 disables pagination.

Examples

  • This command sets the pagination length for the current terminal session to 10 lines.

    switch#terminal length 10
    Pagination set to 10 lines.
  • This command configures the switch to paginate terminal output automatically based on screen size for the current terminal session.
    switch#no terminal length
  • These commands disable pagination globally.
    switch#configure
    switch(config)#terminal length 0
    Pagination disabled.

terminal monitor

The terminal monitor command enables the display of logging output on the terminal during the current terminal session. This command affects only the local monitor. The no terminal monitor command disables direct monitor display of logging output for the current terminal session.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Command Syntax

terminal monitor

no terminal monitor

default terminal monitor

Example

This command enables the display of logging to the local monitor during the current terminal session.
switch#terminal monitor
switch#

trigger

The trigger command specifies what event will trigger the event handler. Handlers can be triggered either by the system booting or by a change in a specified interface’s IP address or operational status.

To specify the action to be taken when the handler is triggered, use the action bash command.

Command Mode

Event-Handler Configuration

Command Syntax

trigger EVENT

Parameters

  • EVENT     event which will trigger the configuration mode event handler. Values include:

    • onboot     triggers when the system reboots, or when you exit event-handler configuration mode. This option takes no further arguments, and passes no environment variables to the action triggered.

      • on-intf INTERFACE CHANGE     triggers when a change is made to the specified interface.
      • on-startup-config      triggers when a change is made to the startup-config file.
      • vm-tracer vm      triggers when a virtual machine monitored by VM Tracer changes state.
  • INTERFACE     the triggering interface. Values include:

    • ethernet number     Ethernet interface specified by number.
    • loopback number     loopback interface specified by number.
    • management number     management interface specified by number.
    • port-channel number     channel group interface specified by number.
    • vlan numver     VLAN interface specified by number.
  • CHANGE     the change being watched for in the triggering interface. Values include:

    • ip triggers when the IPv4 address of the specified interface is changed.
    • ip6 triggers when the IPv6 address of the specified interface is changed.
    • operstatus triggers when the operational status of the specified interface changes.

Examples

  • This command configures the event handler “Eth5” to be triggered when there is a change in the operational status or IP address of Ethernet interface 5.

    switch(config-handler-Eth5)#trigger on-intf Ethernet 5 operstatus ip
    switch(config-handler-Eth5)#
  • This command configures the event handler “onStartup” to be triggered when the system boots, or on exiting event-handler configuration mode.

    switch(config-handler-onStartup)#trigger onboot
    switch(config-handler-onStartup)#